Category Archives: suffering

Protest and Lament

by Sheryl Haw

It was a hot Sunday afternoon in Somalia, good for siesta after a busy week of work at the clinic. We had some sick children in our care, but all seemed on the mend. A tap on my door by one of the Somali nurses led me back to hospital. He had asked me to check on a 2-year-old patient who we were planning to discharge. To my horror on arrival I found the child had died. The mother was weeping, everyone was shocked at this unexpected loss. I was angry – confused and then determined. I took myself into another room and started to wrestle with God. I protested, lamented, grieved, ranted, debated and then decided this simply could not be God’s plan. Decision taken, I sought the rest of the team and explained that I felt we should pray for the child to be raised from the dead! The team looked on, wide eyed! They agreed to stand with me.

We set the scene as best we could “according to the Bible”! Placed everyone out of the room bar the mother and the translator. We explained we wanted to pray for the child and asked if they would give permission. They agreed. Before I could start, one of the team began a prayer which went like this “God, we would like you to restore this child, but if it is not your will please keep her safe with you”. This prayer frustrated me – why give God an out clause!? So, I jumped in and prayed “In the Name of Jesus rise up”. I had my eyes open as I did not want to miss the first breath. I repeated – but no breath came.

We all started to weep, not just for the child and the family’s loss, but now we also wept for ourselves and our faith in God. What followed were some of the most profound conversations we ever had as a team. One member shouted at me as he challenged me as to why I would test God. He then broke down and wept because his brother had died of leukemia and he had also prayed for healing and none had come. Some exploded in anger at the injustice and evil death represented. Others questioned whether we had sufficient faith, others lamented the helplessness we all felt.

Then we had a knock on the door – the translator came to see us. He was deeply moved that we had cared so much as foreigners for this little Somali girl. He was amazed that we had demonstrated love to her family through prayer and comfort and tears of solidarity. We sat in stunned silence. Is that what they had seen?

Of course, we could argue the theology and practice around our approach to deciding to pray – yes, we had a lot to learn. But what I had not anticipated was the witness we gave of love, through lament and protest, through solidarity of grief and the presence we gave to stand in the gap for this child and family.

I have seen God heal miraculously. I have held people as they died. I have not understood why some are healed and some are not. Why some die and some live? The Bible is full of protests, lament, anger, grief and questions. The struggle with God over this is based on the tension of knowing that God is a good, compassionate, just God and a giver of life. The Cross was His demonstrate of his desire to see redemption, healing, restoration, liberation and reconciliation for all. Therefore, we protest when we see pain, suffering, injustice and death.

The Cross is also our hope. It is at the Cross we see the ultimate assurance of God’s love. It is the Cross that carries the pain, the lament, the protest, for it exposes the worst of evil and reveals the breadth of grace, mercy and love. Knowing full well every terrible thing, every painful reality, every agonising thing we face or go through, Jesus set his face towards Jerusalem. He would remove the sting of death, wipe away every tear and set things right. It is done!

And so until he returns, we protest – “How long O Lord” – we lament and grieve – “Lord, the pain is great“.

God receives our cries, he weeps with us, he carries our pain and he reveals his plan. Behold God will make all things new: “He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.” (Rev 21:4).

Prince of Peace?

As we head towards Christmas and celebrate the Prince of Peace coming into the world, it is hard to rationalise this truth with the world news that points to ever increasing violence and suffering. Some would even say it is utopian to imagine a world without conflict, suffering, injustice and poverty.

As we continue to pray for the DRC, and especially Beni, as they face atrocities that appear to be driven by those who seek economic benefit from instability, it is difficult to imagine peace for communities there. In a world in need of food, clean water, shelter and health access, we are astounded to see how much money goes into military activities. Societies even vote for leaders who promise to increase military expenditure!

How do we speak peace/shalom into contexts like these?

We can hope for the promise of peace when Christ returns. (Isaiah 2:4; Micah 4:3; Psalm 46:8-10). Revelation paints an exciting picture of wealth being shared, of no more death, no more war, no more suffering. The presence of the tree of life whose leaves will be used to heal the nations (Revelation 22:2) gives us a sense of hope and anticipation.

More than that – the level of reconciliation that God promises is one in which the lion and lamb lie down together (Isaiah 11:6-9; 65:25).

This redemption and restoration includes not only humanity but all of creation, which we know is groaning for this to happen (Romans 8:22). We read in Revelation 5:13-14 that all creatures will be praising God.

What a joyful future to imagine, to hope for, to believe in and to move towards!

But what about today?

On the one hand we lament and protest against the injustice, the suffering, the conflict, and the poverty we see today, but on the other hand we rejoice in the knowledge that God will defeat evil and will bring peace.

Ambassadors and Servants

We are called to be Christ’s ambassadors of this New Kingdom. In everything we do and say we represent to our hurting world the truth of the new Kingdom and we live in its reality so that wherever we are, we are salt and light for people to taste and see the tangible evidence. We are also servants and follow in our Master’s footsteps to bring liberation, freedom, healing, comfort and hope to all around us. Jesus had time for the one in the crowd who needed his healing, as well as for the 5,000 on the hillside who needed to be fed.

As we pray, lament, protest and rejoice we declare the Kingdom of God, we proclaim the Good News in a world that so needs this truth.

Come, let’s walk together!

By Sheryl Haw